No Miley Here — 2013’s Best Music Videos, #30-21

You might wonder why we’re running a Best Music Videos series for 2013 in April of 2014. It wasn’t something I intended to do, but music videos remain my favorite form of short film. Call them the last bastion of the avant garde in American storytelling. Plus there’s dancing.

So I was upset when I recently looked at music sites’ choices for the best music videos of 2013. These awards used to be opportunities to highlight little-known artists and cleverly experimental filmmakers. A few years ago, Kanye West amused/upset the zeitgeist when he grabbed a microphone from Taylor Swift at MTV’s 2009 Video Music Awards and declared, “I’m going to let you finish, but…” What turned out to be a brilliant career move for Kanye overshadowed the fact that Best Female Video had come down to a plaintively cheesy Taylor Swift lullaby and an above-average, yet fairly standard, Beyonce dance video.

Kanye Taylor

What did the experts declare the best music video of 2013? Well, British staple NME awarded their Music Video of the Year to the Eagulls for “Nerve Endings.” The video featured time-lapse photography of a pig’s brain rotting and being eaten by maggots, with other images washed over it.

Fantastic, Eagulls. You’ve recorded the equivalent of a fanfiction video for Nine Inch Nails 20 years ago and, like a lot of fanfiction, you missed why that imagery was used in the first place. I get it, the Eagulls are punk and their whole schtick is that their interpretation of the imagery doesn’t matter, with a light coat of flipping the bird to those who say punk’ll rot your brain. It’s cute, or as cute as rotting pig brains can be, but it’s a one-note joke, two decades derivative, and it doesn’t deserve to be video of the year.

Rolling Stone‘s top 10 was a similar travesty. Their argument for Vampire Weekend’s “Diane Young” was that it had a lot of music industry cameos. So do commercials. They also chose Atoms for Peace’s “Ingenue” because it has Radiohead’s Thom Yorke dancing in it. Both videos have cameos to get done, but neither has much of a point to make.

Worse yet, Rolling Stone chose two of the most inane videos I’ve ever seen in an attempt to attach themselves to those videos’ popularity. At #5, they chose Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines,” which is basically about a singer and his friends molesting nude women. Rolling Stone argues it’s really feminist deep down, because even though all they do is leer at topless women while Thicke sings about how they’re nothing but sex objects, they do it really obviously.

Anti-Robin Thicke protesters

Then they chose Miley Cyrus’s “We Can’t Stop” at #1, their argument being that – even though it’s a disaster – look at how much of a disaster it is! It’s like a flaming car wreck! Good job furthering the art, Rolling Stone. Their choices largely seemed to be made by how ironic their inclusions would look in a top 10. Feminism by way of molestation and good by way of being so bad it’s a disaster. Everyone stop trying to communicate insightful social messages and raw emotion. Just make something extra-disastrous. Rolling Stone has really got that irony thing down.

Spin was more consistent – at least while they were awarding “Blurred Lines” best video of the year, it included Miley Cyrus dry-humping a hammer in “Wrecking Ball” instead of “We Can’t Stop.”

My issue is that choosing the best music video of the year has turned into choosing which one made the most news. It’s choosing which celebrity you covered the most, not which video had the most creative energy or artistic merit. By that logic, we don’t need any of those sites to hand out awards – we just need Google Analytics.

In response to this, several of us sat down and watched nearly 400 music videos to come up with a top 30. Cleopatra Parnell and Vanessa Tottle helped to narrow the field and made the final rankings with me. Special thanks to Hayley Williams for additional suggestions.

Without further ado, #30-21 on the list. Please be aware that music videos disproportionately carry epilepsy warnings because of the tendency for quick edits and flashing lights.

Honorable Mention (we cheated one extra): “gun-shy” – Grizzly Bear
directed by Kris Moyes

The Gif-style editing, combining repeated actions together, will either annoy or hypnotize you. Personally, I tend toward the latter, and the more I watch it, the more engrossing it becomes. It’s a fantastically weird video that we all liked immensely, but couldn’t agree on giving a place in the list.

#30: “The Same Old Ground” – He’s My Brother She’s My Sister

He’s My Brother She’s My Sister just makes good, enjoyable blues folk music. Their glam rock style reflects Jack White’s style minus the egoism. Really, this is an energetic performance video, but sometimes being joyous and colorful is enough.

#29: “Lovers in the Parking Lot” – Solange
directed by Emily Kai Bock, Solange, Peter J. Brant

This is a low-energy, chilled out dance piece featuring Solange at closing time in a Houston mall. It reminds me a bit of Fatboy Slim’s “Weapon of Choice,” featuring Christopher Walken – it’s just fun to watch, listen to, and there’s very little pretense. You’ll also notice co-director Emily Kai Bock’s name a lot in this top 30. That’s not a coincidence.

#28: “Despair” – Yeah Yeah Yeahs
directed by Patrick Daughters

“Despair” is a song that thanks that feeling of helplessness for being a lifelong companion. Its video succeeds because of two crucial decisions. The first is in isolating Karen O’s vocal track to start the video. The song itself is a cathartic piece of music that takes a few listens to achieve its full impact, but a music video doesn’t always get those repeat viewings. Isolating Karen O before starting the song proper delivers the message point blank at the beginning.

The second decision was to film at the top of the Empire State Building. The location isn’t the building’s impressive tower itself – the band is instead filmed in front of the fences put up to stop people from jumping off the top. The encroaching morning over New York’s skyline, the arrival of the band, the crescendo of the music, and Karen O’s costume and energy changes each contribute to feeding the cathartic, triumphal energy of the song itself.

#27: “Horns Surrounding Me” – Julia Holter
directed by Angus Borsos, concept by Ramona Gonzalez

Combining the narrative cinematography style of David Lynch and bold art direction that echoes horror master Dario Argento is a solid recipe for a music video no one will get, but that is still fascinating. It fits the intent of surrealism like a glove, evoking curiosity and danger while sparking the kind of narrative connections that allow the viewer to edge out the director as owner of the story.

#26: “Reflektor” – Arcade Fire
directed by Anton Corbijn

“Reflektor” encourages a lot of debate. Its imagery is simultaneously weirder yet more literal than something more unabashedly surreal like “Horns Surrounding Me.” Its a wickedly fun blend, and the song is one of 2013’s best.

#25: “Loaded Gun” – Lightning Dust
directed by Zachary Rothman

This is the definition of waiting for the other shoe to drop. It’s composed of incredibly simple visual ideas. You’re going to wonder why it’s on the list until its powerful, central image is revealed. Then you’re going to call that friend of yours in the Tea Party and get in an argument.

#24: “Childhood’s End” – Majical Cloudz
directed by Emily Kai Bock

This is director Emily Kai Bock’s second appearance on the list already. Her video for “Childhood’s End” shows a mastery of storytelling and photographic presentation. I could go on and on comparing her framing to photographer Philip-Lorca diCordia or Hungarian director Bela Tarr, or I could just tell you that this is going to make you choke up big time.

#23: “This Place Was A Shelter” – Olafur Arnalds
directed by Adam Bedzsula and Erik Kocsis

What makes this video special is that the metaphor it’s describing to you and the metaphor you think you’re seeing are wholly different. It’s a twist – not a narrative one, but rather one in your own perception – that connects you to that powerful moment of loss that each of us undergoes at some point in our lives

#22: “Katachi” – Shogu Tokumaru
directed by Kijek and Adamski

OK, we’re done making you cry…for today. “Katachi” is a video made entirely using stop-motion animation and paper cutouts. It’s a visually inventive and joyful accomplishment.

#21: “Lillies” – Bat for Lashes
directed by Peter Sluszka

This is simply a celebration of growing into and trusting one’s own imagination. It features a ton of stop-motion animation and singer Natasha Khan forming bonds with giant muppets. It harkens back to Kate Bush’s influence on British music videos, and it’s a fun and touching video to witness.

Videos #20-11 will run on Thursday, April 10.
Videos #10-1 will run on Tuesday, April 15.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s